The View from the Window

This sweet little photo by Roland Portillo (www.flickr.com/rolandbp) gives a writer a lot to think about. Cats are such interesting creatures. Whole volumes could be written on what fascinates a cat, since they so often stare intensely at what appears to be nothing. Here, the subject of this fascination is left to the imagination.

Cat sitting on small side table staring out window through lace curtain.

Fascinated Cat

What could be outside that window that has captured this cat’s attention? A bird, perhaps, or another cat. Maybe there is a fly or spider inching its way up the window, behind the curtain. Perhaps the cat can see into the house next door. Or could it merely be the shadows of clouds in the sky, or a passing airplane that has riveted this animal so?

Whose house is this? Is the cat allowed on the table? What ways might the owner have tried to keep the animal off it? And why is the cat on the table, and not on the back of the upholstered chair where it could stretch out and get truly comfortable? Was there anything else on the table that perhaps the cat’s tail has shoved onto the floor? What would it be?

The table holds a lovely Tiffany-style lamp, but there is only one bulb in it. Why? And why are there no magazines in the magazine holder at the base of the table? Who owns this house, and why have they not utilized the table fully? And what is the curly cord that is draped over the arm of the chair? If this is an adjustable chair, it could be simply the control for it. But if it’s not, maybe the telephone receiver has been buried in the crevice between arm and seat. Why? Who would have done it?

If this cat were a person, what kind of person would it be? How would its cat-like traits translate into human form? Who do you find in this picture, in this cat?

Happy wrting!
Susan

I Recommend: Any of Eric Jerome Dickey’s Gideon series: Dying for Revenge, Waking With Enemies, Sleeping With Strangers, Resurrecting Midnight. Gideon is one of the most fascinating anti-heroes to come along the anti-hero pike, and Dickey’s unique voice makes danger dangerously fascinating. Definitely a great series read, well written and superbly crafted.

 

About Susan Tuttle

Susan Tuttle is a professional freelance editor, writing instructor and award winning author of 12 books—6 nonfiction on writing (Write It Right), 5 suspense novels and one collection of award-winnign short stories. She also has stories in both volumes of "Deadlines", the new anthology from the Central Coast Chapter of Sisters in Crime (SinC), She is currently working on volume #1 of her Skylark P.I. series (a PI with paranormal abilities), as well as 2 YA fantasy series. Follow her on Twitter and FaceBook.